Monday, April 26, 2010

Curves Ahead.

Or maybe not, if you're a viewer of ABC or Fox.

By now, if you watch any primetime TV, you've probably seen the Victoria Secret ad about "The Nakeds". It's a lingerie commercial featuring all the gorgeous Victoria's Secret girls prancing around in their underwear. Specifically, the commercial has often apparently aired during Dancing With The Stars.

Lane Bryant is now calling foul, after both ABC and Fox refused to air a lingerie ad featuring a plus-sized model during the same program. You can watch the video here. You can also read what Lane Bryant had to say about the article here and here.

Here's an excerpt of what Lane Bryant had to say: "While it’s no secret that Victoria’s Secret “The Nakeds” ads are prancing around on major networks leaving little to the imagination, steaming up t.v. screens and baring nearly everything but their souls, our sultry siren who shows sophisticated sass is somehow deemed inappropriate. The network exclaimed, she has “too much cleavage”  Gasp! Does that make sense to you?  It doesn’t to us either. Does this smack of a double standard?  Yep. It does to us, too." 

It does to me too. Apparently, the networks finally agreed to show the ad in the final 10 moments of the program. But there's still and inequality there because there hasn't been a restriction on any of the VS ads.  Aren't we past this yet? Did you miss the massive public praise that Glamour magazine received when they published an article featuring a model with an actual belly? Lizzi Miller is beautiful, belly or not, and the women (and men) of the US have affirmed that!

Shame on you ABC and Fox.



9 comments:

  1. I read about this in the news and agree with you completely. Shame!

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  2. Yes there's a double standard, but isn't the network allowed to air whatever they want when they want as long as they're not charging for the spot and then not airing it?

    And more importantly, that's a plus sized model? Ha!

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  3. I heard ABC and Fox deny ever refusing to air the ad or asking for edits. I'm prone to believe them because the have the means and staff to spin their refusal to try to fix their mistakes, albeit not believably but perhaps eloquently, so they wouldn't have to lie about it not taking place and shouldn't lie if Lane Bryant has evidence to back up the alleged demands or refusals.

    According to the networks, Lane Bryant made it up to get attention for the ad campaign. But I haven't followed up in a while; did Lane Bryant provide the evidence to prove ABC and Fox refused or asked for edits? I would love to know.

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  4. Definitely doesn't seem fair. Thanks for your comment today, the race this past weekend was just a 10K (6.2 miles), the big "half" isn't until June 5 (it'll be here before we know it!) and unfortunately, I won't be able to run or see the course until the day before-it's across the great state of MO!

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  5. I'm always more than a little amused that plus-size models are rarely normal-looking chicks. Just marginally more normal than other models.

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  6. yeah, that sucks. and it's true that networks can deny ads for any reason (although, in this age of instant/viral sharing, they usually get called out on it quickly and change their minds).
    kinda funny too considering that the vs fashion show is a primetime special on cbs... now THAT'S too much clevage! :)

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  7. I just roll my eyes and try to not let myself get too upset over these things. But yeah, it's totally ridiculous.

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  8. Agreed. It's ridiculous and a shame.

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  9. Here Here! I couldn't agree more!

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